Wednesday, November 29, 2023

UC Irvine’s Basic Needs Center launched a mobile food pantry on Nov. 15 and Andrea Mora, Director of UCI's Basic Needs Center, joins host Janeane to share details

Andrea Mora, Director of UCI's Basic Needs Center, joins host Janeane on November 20th to talk about the launch of the mobile food pantry


LISTEN
to today's show

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 13, 2023  The Basic Needs Center at the University of California, Irvine will unveil its new mobile food pantry, a 22-foot-long customized delivery van, at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, at the Pereira Drive roundabout in front of the Aldrich Hall flagpoles. The first 200 attendees will receive collapsible Tupperware products.

The center will also launch its ZotFunder campaign, running until Dec. 31, to raise money to stock the mobile pantry, which is designed to make food more accessible to all enrolled students at UCI and bring it nearer to where they live.

The UCI Basic Needs Center received an innovation grant of $245,000 from the UC Office of the President to purchase and adapt the van, now painted blue and adorned with colorful images of produce and anteaters. Food distributions will begin on Dec. 8 at Arroyo Vista housing and on Dec. 15 at Verano 8 housing. The winter-quarter distribution schedule is pending, but the vehicle will be at these locations once per month on Fridays.

“For years, we’ve been hearing from students that access is really important to them. We envisioned a second pantry model that would bring food closer to students, and with the mobile food pantry, it’s now available,” said Andrea Mora, director of the UCI Basic Needs Center.

Once students check in at the vehicle, they will select items from a menu of perishables (milk, almond milk, eggs, yogurt, tofu and frozen prepared meals), nonperishables (bread, pasta, oats, peanut butter, tuna, soup and beans) and produce (apples, oranges, lemons, yams, potatoes, onions and carrots). They will also be screened for CalFresh benefits eligibility and have access to informational resources.

The mobile food pantry will operate in tandem with the UCI Basic Needs Center’s FRESH Pantry, which will be open Tuesdays through Thursdays as of Dec. 8.

Students wishing to use the mobile pantry will be told its location when they make an appointment through the UCI Basic Needs Center website. Appointments are currently required, but this may change based on the first distribution. The center may start taking walk-ins around 2 p.m. on Dec. 15.

“We’re excited to take this new effort out to the community,” Mora said.

Watch UCI's mobile food pantry on ABC News.

UCI’s Brilliant Future campaign: Publicly launched on Oct. 4, 2019, the Brilliant Future campaign aims to raise awareness and support for the university. By engaging 75,000 alumni and garnering $2 billion in philanthropic investment, UCI seeks to reach new heights of excellence in student success, health and wellness, research and more. Learn more at https://brilliantfuture.uci.edu.

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities and is ranked among the nation’s top 10 public universities by U.S. News & World Report. The campus has produced five Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 36,000 students and offers 224 degree programs. It’s located in one of the world’s safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County’s second-largest employer, contributing $7 billion annually to the local economy and $8 billion statewide. For more on UCI, visit www.uci.edu.

Wednesday, November 22, 2023

Coming up Wednesday November 22nd, 2023 @9:00am LIVE on KUCI - Rabbi Elie Kaplan Spitz, an author, attorney, meditation teacher, and popular lecturer. Rabbi Spitz shares details of his latest book - Duets on Psalms and more

 


to today's show featuring
Rabbi Spitz

Elie Kaplan Spitz is an author, rabbi, attorney, meditation teacher, and popular lecturer. He served as the spiritual leader of Congregation Bnai Israel of Tustin, CA for over 33 years and as a member of the Rabbinical Assemblys Committee of Jewish Law and Standards for twenty years. He has published four books: Does the Soul Survive? Jewish Views of the Afterlife, Past Lives, and Living with Purpose (2000, 2015); Healing from Despair: Choosing Wholeness in a Broken World (2008), and Increasing Wholeness:  Jewish Wisdom and Guided Meditations to Strengthen and Calm Body, Heart, Mind and Spirit (2015), and Duets on Psalms: Drawing New Meanings from Ancient Words (2023).  


His writings address topics of both Jewish and universal concern, including:

> How would a contemporary juror view survival of the soul?

> How to live a balanced life and sleep better at night

> How are Biblical writings relevant to us today?


Rabbi Spitz will also share:

> His journey to becoming a Rabbi

> How the Psalms in his new book can apply to anyone of any faith

> How these messages bring solace in a time of divisiveness, etc

> What he would like readers to take away from his new book





Psalms are our people’s songs, an ancient playlist that still strikes a chord in our hearts. From lamentation to celebration, the Psalms speak to us from generation to generation.

Rabbis Elie Spitz and Jack Riemer take us into a deeper exploration of the Psalms, going beyond the surface meaning of the words with new, thoughtful interpretations, taking a fresh look at these ancient texts and the relevance they can hold for us today. These contemporary translations of the ancient text reveal new facets of insight and understanding.

It is a testament to their lasting power that the Psalms continue to provide readers with solace, challenge, inspiration, and more. Duets on Psalms will inspire you to revisit these ancient texts and see them with fresh eyes because, in the end, it’s not what the psalmist intended that matters but the meaning you gain from each psalm, making their words your own.

“Rarely do we get to sit by the side of two spiritual leaders at the height of their powers, to savor their wisdom as they unveil the deep wisdom and compassionate heart in the Book of Psalms. These ancient poems, newly translated, have spoken to seeking souls across the generations. Thanks to Rabbis Riemer and Spitz, they can speak to us now!”

—Rabbi Bradley Shavit Artson, Dean of Ziegler School of Rabbinic Studies at the American Jewish University, author God of Becoming and Relationship: The Dynamic Nature of Process Theology

“In Duets on Psalms, two remarkable rabbis breathe new life into the ancient words of The Book of Psalms. Rabbi Elie Spitz and Rabbi Jack Riemer perfectly complement one another offering us close readings, new translations, modern scholarship and timeless wisdom. They give us the tools to allow the words of the Psalms to open our minds and enter our hearts. This illuminating work is a literary journey filled with faith, wisdom, hope, healing, meaning and inspiration.”

—Rabbi Naomi Levy, author of Einstein and the Rabbi and To Begin Again

“Not just rabbis and pastors, but everyone who loves the Psalms should own this wonderful book. Rabbi Jack and Rabbi Elie have not only learned the Psalms all their lives, they have lived the Psalms through decades of ministry to people in every possible phase and crisis of life. This book oozes with authentic wisdom that only comes from investing a lifetime in both God’s Word and God’s world.”

—Pastor Rick Warren, author of The Purpose Driven Life

“In Duets on the Psalms, Rabbis Riemer and Spitz, two of the master teachers of our times, prove the truth of the rabbinic adage, ‘Turn [the Scripture] over and over again, for all is in it,’ by providing new readings of familiar texts. Through their multi-layered explorations of and commentaries upon eleven psalms that address the gamut of human emotions and aspirations, they provide the reader with new insights and meanings into the human condition that stimulate the mind but more significantly transform the soul. Theirs is a spiritual masterpiece!”

—Rabbi David Ellenson, Chancellor Emeritus of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion

“What a brilliant combination. Rabbis Jack Riemer and Elie Spitz, two of Judaism’s most inspirational teachers, offer a lifetime of insights on the Bible’s most inspired book. A work to read and reread and to return to for inspiration.”

—Rabbi Joseph Telushkin, author of Jewish Literacy and Words that Hurt Words that Heal

“When great souls come together, there can be sparks. When they unite to find new meaning in the sacred songs and poems of the book of Psalms, a fire burns.”

—Craig Taubman, singer and composer

The Power of Purpose-Driven Initiatives during the holidays and throughout the year! Here are some ways you can volunteer in Orange County right now



There are numerous volunteer opportunities throughout Orange County during the holidays and throughtout the year. Oranizations of all sizes need your help, from animal shelters to homeless outreach and food banks. Here is a link filled with resources!


Volunteer Opportunities | Enjoy OC (enjoyorangecounty.com)

Wednesday, November 15, 2023

Wednesday November 15th - Kelly Sather, winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize for her forthcoming powerhouse of a book, Small in Real Life.

Kelly Sather, winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize for her forthcoming powerhouse of a book, Small in Real Life. As a former entertainment lawyer, and screenwriter, Kelly has really captured the emotion, ambition, humanity, and conflict in her characters on their search for power, fame, love, and the possibility of and redemption. Kelly's writing is undeniably moving and sharp-- an easy read with so much to discuss-- the dark side of the quest for a better life.



ABOUT THE BOOK
Small in Real Life invokes the myth and melancholy of Southern California glamor, of starry-eyed women and men striving for their own Hollywood shimmer and the seamy undersides and luxurious mystique of the Golden State. Exiled to a Malibu rehab, an alcoholic paparazzo spies on his celebrity friend for an online tabloid. Down to her last dollar, a Hollywood hanger-on steals designer handbags from her dying friend’s bungalow. Blinded by grief, an LA judge atones after condescending to a failed actress on a date. When hunger for power, fame, and love betrays the senses, the characters in these nine stories must reckon with false choices and their search for belonging with the wrong people. Small in Real Life offers an insider’s view of California and the golden promises of possibility and redemption that have long made the West glitter.

ABOUT KELLY SATHER

Kelly Sather is the author of SMALL IN REAL LIFE (Oct. 2023), her debut short story collection, and winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, a book that evokes the myth and melancholy of Los Angeles. A former entertainment lawyer and screenwriter, she pulls back the curtain to reveal the power, desire, and illusions beneath the California Dream. Her work has appeared in Santa Monica Review, J Journal, Pembroke Magazine, PANK, and elsewhere. She grew up in L.A. and lives in Northern California.




“Kelly Sather is a clear-eyed observer. These stories remind the readers of the thrills and dangers of living, and that we are never far from the undercurrent of human emotions, both mysterious and meaningful.”
—Yiyun Li, author of The Book of Goose

2023 Drue Heinz Literature Prize Winner explores the seamy undersides and luxurious mystique of California

Pittsburgh, PA – Kelly Sather of Larkspur, CA is the 2023 winner of the Drue Heinz Literature Prize, one of the nation’s most prestigious awards for a collection of short stories. Sather's debut book, Small in Real Life, was selected by author Deesha Philyaw. The University of Pittsburgh Press will publish Small in Real Life on October 3, 2023.

“This compact but mighty collection explores both the heights and depths of the unsavory business of being human,” says Philyaw, National Book Award finalist and author of The Secret Lives of Church Ladies. “With exquisite, emotionally rich prose, every single story surprises and unsettles. Tenderness co-exists with terror, beauty alongside betrayal. Characters are at turns earnest and terrible as they grapple with longing, lust, grief, regret, and disappointment in these utterly original stories. The heart of this brilliant collection is chaos––the way the universe is chaotic, unpredictable, and simply dazzling.”

The stories in Small in Real Life invoke the myth and melancholy of Southern California glamour, of starry-eyed women and men striving for their own Hollywood shimmer no matter the consequences. Exiled to a Malibu rehab, an alcoholic paparazzi spies on his celebrity friend for an online tabloid. Down to her last dollar, a Hollywood hanger-on steals designer handbags from her dying friend’s bungalow. Blinded by grief, an LA judge atones after condescending to a failed actress on a date. When hunger for power, fame, and love betrays the senses, we must reckon with false choices and our human struggle to appear brighter to our beholders. Small in Real Life offers an insider’s view of California, and the golden promises of possibility and redemption that have long made the West glitter.

“I’m thrilled and honored Deesha Philyaw selected my story collection for the Drue Heinz Prize,” reflected Sather. “When I submitted the manuscript I imagined this step towards publishing, but to hear the good news, that my stories were selected by a writer I admire so much and my first book will be published this year, was tremendous. I’m grateful to Deesha Philyaw, Drue Heinz and University of Pittsburgh Press for their support of the short story.

Kelly Sather is a writer, former entertainment lawyer, and screenwriter. Her stories and reviews have appeared in Santa Monica Review, J Journal, Pembroke Magazine, PANK, ZYZZYVA, and elsewhere. She grew up in Los Angeles. and lives in Northern California.

In addition to publication by UPP, the Drue Heinz award also includes a cash prize of $15,000. Drue Heinz, who passed away in 2018, created the endowment for this accolade in 1981. Jane McCafferty is the managing editor for the Drue Heinz Prize.

###

Small in Real Life by Kelly Sather, will be published by the University of Pittsburgh Press with an on-sale date of October 3, 2023 · 150 pp · 6 x 9 · ISBN 9780822947998 · Cloth $24.00 · eBook available.




PRAISE

“Small in Real Life is a heart-piercing and haunting debut. Kelly Sather is a writer possessed of rare courage—the courage to render our darkest tendencies and the last flicker of light we are terrified to lose. Each of these gorgeous, unflinching stories is the shard of broken mirror, refracting pieces of our impossible lives, showing us what we’ve done and what we look like right now.”
—Bret Anthony Johnston, author of Remember Me Like This


“This compact but mighty collection explores both the heights and depths of the unsavory business of being human. With exquisite, emotionally rich prose, every story surprises and unsettles. Tenderness coexists with terror, beauty alongside betrayal. Characters are at turns earnest and terrible as they grapple with longing, lust, grief, regret, and disappointment. The heart of this brilliant collection is chaos––the way the universe is chaotic, unpredictable, and simply dazzling.”

— Deesha Philyaw, author of The Secret Lives of Church Ladies and finalist for the National Book Award


“In Kelly Sather’s phenomenal short story collection, she compresses the daily commotion of life into riveting moments of reckoning, whether earned or forced. Desire can obscure or illuminate, and in these compelling stories, Sather’s characters deal with the complications of wanting and existing in the world. Sentence by sentence, Small in Real Life is one of the best debuts I’ve ever read.”
—Michele Filgate, editor of What My Mother and I Don’t Talk About


“Reading this very brilliant debut feels like holding a live wire, receiving a kind of shock our current literature seldom gives. It’s a shock we need. Kelly Sather’s characters, seeking escape from unbearable lives, are canny, na├»ve, cruel, bewildered, sometimes a little despicable, always entirely human—and utterly indifferent to our sympathy. Small in Real Life has a rare wisdom, born of freedom from illusions most of the rest of us can’t bear to let go of. This is among the most impressive new books of fiction I have read in years.”

— Garth Greenwell, author of Cleanness

Monday, November 13, 2023

Irvine, Calif., Nov. 13, 2023 — The Basic Needs Center at the University of California, Irvine will unveil its new mobile food pantry, a 22-foot-long customized delivery van, at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15





NEWS

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


https://news.uci.edu/2023/11/13/uc-irvines-basic-needs-center-to-launch-mobile-food-pantry-on-nov-15/



Contact: Cara Capuano

949-501-9192

ccapuano@uci.edu


UC Irvine’s Basic Needs Center to launch mobile food pantry on Nov. 15

Delivery vehicle will expand student access to essential provisions



Irvine, Calif., Nov. 13, 2023 — The Basic Needs Center at the University of California, Irvine will unveil its new mobile food pantry, a 22-foot-long customized delivery van, at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 15, at the Pereira Drive roundabout in front of the Aldrich Hall flagpoles. The first 200 attendees will receive collapsible Tupperware products.

The center will also launch its ZotFunder campaign, running until Dec. 31, to raise money to stock the mobile pantry, which is designed to make food more accessible to all enrolled students at UCI and bring it nearer to where they live.

The UCI Basic Needs Center received an innovation grant of $245,000 from the UC Office of the President to purchase and adapt the van, now painted blue and adorned with colorful images of produce and anteaters. Food distributions will begin on Dec. 8 at Arroyo Vista housing and on Dec. 15 at Verano 8 housing. The winter-quarter distribution schedule is pending, but the vehicle will be at these locations once per month on Fridays.

“For years, we’ve been hearing from students that access is really important to them. We envisioned a second pantry model that would bring food closer to students, and with the mobile food pantry, it’s now available,” said Andrea Mora, director of the UCI Basic Needs Center.

Once students check in at the vehicle, they will select items from a menu of perishables (milk, almond milk, eggs, yogurt, tofu and frozen prepared meals), nonperishables (bread, pasta, oats, peanut butter, tuna, soup and beans) and produce (apples, oranges, lemons, yams, potatoes, onions and carrots). They will also be screened for CalFresh benefits eligibility and have access to informational resources.

The mobile food pantry will operate in tandem with the UCI Basic Needs Center’s FRESH Pantry, which will be open Tuesdays through Thursdays as of Dec. 8.

Students wishing to use the mobile pantry will be told its location when they make an appointment through the UCI Basic Needs Center website. Appointments are currently required, but this may change based on the first distribution. The center may start taking walk-ins around 2 p.m. on Dec. 15.


“We’re excited to take this new effort out to the community,” Mora said.

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities and is ranked among the nation's top 10 public universities by U.S. News & World Report. The campus has produced five Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 36,000 students and offers 224 degree programs. It’s located in one of the world’s safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County’s second-largest employer, contributing $7 billion annually to the local economy and $8 billion statewide. For more on UCI, visit www.uci.edu.


Wednesday, November 8, 2023

November 8th at 9:00am LIVE on KUCI 88.9fm - Janeane speaks with Steven Davis, UCI professor of Earth system science, who shares details about the UC Irvine-led science team and how to eat our way out of the climate crisis


lead author Steven Davis, UCI professor of Earth system science

LISTEN  to today's show


UC Irvine-led science team shows how to eat our way out of the climate crisis

Researchers explore the benefits of producing farm-free food


Irvine, Calif., Nov. 6, 2023 — Agriculture is one of the hardest human activities to decarbonize; people must eat, but the land-use practices associated with growing crops account for roughly a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions evaluate a new solution to this problem, one that eliminates farms altogether.

In a study published today in Nature Sustainability, the UCI-led team of scientists assess the potential for widescale synthetic production of dietary fats through chemical and biological processes. The raw materials for this method are the same as those used by plants: hydrogen in water and carbon dioxide in the air.

“Large-scale synthesis of edible molecules through chemical and biological means without agricultural feedstocks is a very real possibility,” said lead author Steven Davis, UCI professor of Earth system science. “Such ‘food without the farm’ could avoid enormous quantities of climate-warming emissions while also safeguarding biodiverse lands that might otherwise be cleared for farms.”

Davis and his co-authors highlight other environmental and societal benefits of farm-free food in the paper, including a reduction in water use and watershed pollution, local control over food production, diminished risk of weather-related food shortages, and less need for low-paying and physically demanding agricultural labor. Another plus, according to Davis, would be the possibility of returning existing farmlands to a natural state, which could enhance biodiversity and build up natural carbon sinks.

“I like the idea of not depending on photosynthesis for everything we eat,” Davis said. “At whatever scale, synthesizing food will alleviate competition between natural ecosystems and agriculture, thereby avoiding the many environmental costs of farming.”


Davis highlighted the practice of razing tropical rainforests to create space for palm oil plantations. Cookies, crackers, snack chips and a lot of other middle-of-the-store products are made with dietary fats coming from this source. He asked if anybody would notice if the oil used to bake their cookies came from a food refinery up the road instead of a plantation in Indonesia.

The authors of the paper said they focused much of their attention on fats because they are the “simplest nutrients to synthesize thermochemically,” pointing to established large-scale soap-making and polymer chemistry techniques.


The researchers estimated that agriculturally derived fats correspond to roughly 
1 to 3 grams of emitted carbon dioxide per thousand calories, whereas molecularly identical fats synthesized from natural gas feedstock using available electricity would produce less than a gram of CO2 equivalent emissions, and nearly zero emissions if using carbon capture from the air and non-emitting sources of electricity.

“The beauty of the fats is that you can synthesize them with processes that don’t involve biology. It’s all chemistry, and because of that, you can operate at higher pressures and temperatures that allow excellent efficiency,” Davis said. “You could therefore build big reactors to do this at large scales.”


A big remaining question is, will people accept food created in this manner?


“Food is a tougher problem than electricity; few people care where the electrons in our wall socket originate, but many people care a lot about where their food comes from,” Davis said. “Processed foods are thus a likely use for synthetic fats. Folks may be less concerned about what kind of fat is in a store-bought cookie or pie crust because they don’t know what’s in there right now.”

Davis’ collaborators on this research project, which received financial support from the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Department of Agriculture, included Ken Caldeira, Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford, Calif., and Breakthrough Energy, Kirkland Wash.; Kathleen Alexander, Ian McKay and Matthew Shaner, Orca Sciences, Kirkland, Wash.; Juan Moreno-Cruz, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada; Chaopeng Hong, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, China.


ABOUT PROFESSOR STEVEN DAVIS

Professor of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine: [Ph.D. in Geological and Environmental Sciences from Stanford University]. Prof. Davis works to understand and find ways to meet the challenge of satisfying global demand for energy, food, and goods without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.

He is interested in studies of coupled human and natural systems and sustainable systems analysis, including: energy technology and policy; of pollution and resources embodied in international trade; of socio-economic inertia and “lock-in” of environmental problems; and of the complex interactions of energy systems, agriculture, climate change, and global ecology.

Learn more: Steven J. Davis - Earth System Scientist (uci.edu)

About the University of California, Irvine: Founded in 1965, UCI is a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities and is ranked among the nation's top 10 public universities by U.S. News & World Report. The campus has produced five Nobel laureates and is known for its academic achievement, premier research, innovation and anteater mascot. Led by Chancellor Howard Gillman, UCI has more than 36,000 students and offers 224 degree programs. It’s located in one of the world’s safest and most economically vibrant communities and is Orange County’s second-largest employer, contributing $7 billion annually to the local economy and $8 billion statewide. For more on UCI, visit www.uci.edu.

Wednesday, November 1, 2023

Coming up November 1st 9:00am - G.B. Smith and his stunning photobook “Pathways”



G.B. Smith and his stunning photobook “Pathways” (G Editions, Nov. 7, 2023). The book features several of Smith’s recent multi-award winning images, and the curation reflects the simplicity and uncluttered form of his distinctive black and white style. Informed by his experience with color blindness, Smith’s work encourages the viewer to examine a world that exists beyond color.

LISTEN to today's show featuring G.B. Smith.

Among Smith’s many accolades are three consecutive Gold Medals in the architecture, fine art and nature categories at the Prix de la Photographie awards in Paris.

Believing that art should make a positive impact, Smith will be donating proceeds from the sales of “Pathways” to the Breast Cancer Alliance.

“I have long admired G.B. Smith’s singular ability to focus and to strip away distractions to help others see the most important elements….he studies his subjects with care and thinks deeply about all that he wants us to see.”
–Lawton W. Fitt, former head of The Royal Academy of Arts



About G.B. Smith
Born in the industrial heartland of England, G.B. Smith began his photographic journey almost fifty years ago as a teenager in apprenticeship of traditional film techniques both in the darkroom and with large plate cameras. The simplicity and deliberateness of his images today reflect the mindfulness of this traditional approach, manifested in modern digital technology. Having grown up with extreme color blindness, Smith strips away visual distractions to focus on the structures and patterns as he sees them. His images bring solace to a psyche constantly overwhelmed by the overstimulation of color, and encourage us to look beyond color. Given his industrial heritage, many of his studies gravitate toward decaying man-made structures and their interaction with the regenerative power of nature. A truly global citizen, having lived on multiple continents and worked extensively in six, Smith now resides in Maryland. To learn more, visit: www.gbsmith.com and follow him on Instagram @g.b.smith.photography


In an interview, G.B. Smith can discuss:

  • His journey as a photographer, from his teenage start to his current artistic prowess
  • How being color-blind contributes to his signature minimalist, black-and-white approach to photography
  • Why he’s donating proceeds from book sales to the Breast Cancer Alliance, underscoring his commitment to making a positive impact through art
  • The Baltimore-area imagery featured in the book, offering a captivating narrative rooted in his surroundings
  • His “other persona” as one of the longest serving CEOs of a public high technology company, and its influence on his artistic approach

UC Irvine’s Basic Needs Center launched a mobile food pantry on Nov. 15 and Andrea Mora, Director of UCI's Basic Needs Center, joins host Janeane to share details

Andrea Mora, Director of UCI's Basic Needs Center, joins host Janeane on November 20th to talk about the launch of the mobile food pantr...