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Sunday, June 30, 2019

7/1/19 @9:45am pst - Vlada Knowlton - Director, Writer, Producer, Editor joined host Janeane to talk about her film The Most Dangerous Year




LISTEN to today's conversation with 
featured guest Vlada Knowlton


THE MOST DANGEROUS YEAR - a film that chronicles the fight in Washington over the notorious anti-transgender “bathroom bills” introduced into legislation in 2016 - a year that the Human Rights Campaign called 'the most dangerous year' for transgender Americans. Director Vlada Knowlton humanizes the hot button topic of gender identity as she documents the lives of several trans children and their families, including her own 5 year old daughter. While Knowlton passionately follows the story of anti–transgender legislation, the heart of the film lies in the stories of the families who accept and support their kids for exactly who they are. A brilliant, encouraging story in these challenging times. Take a look at the trailer here.

With the recent White House military trans ban, and this year going on record as surpassing 2016 as the most dangerous years for transgender and gender non-conforming people - the battle for trans rights is on-going, and requires vigilance in demonstrating to the world that trans people are human beings that deserve the same rights as their fellow citizens. THE MOST DANGEROUS YEAR aims to contribute to the education of people on this subject to help get us all to the point of understanding and acceptance, while allowing trans people the privilege to simply live as themselves.


The film opens in L.A. Friday, April 26 and on VOD in June - timed to Pride Month


A film by Vlada Knowlton

RT: 90 mins

In early 2016, when a dark wave of anti-transgender “bathroom bills” began sweeping across the nation, The Human Rights Campaign published a report identifying 2016 as the most dangerous year for transgender Americans. In Washington State alone, six such “bathroom bills” were introduced in the State Legislature. Filmmaker Vlada Knowlton captured the ensuing civil rights battle from the perspective of a group of embattled parents as they banded together to fight a deluge of proposed laws that would strip away the rights of their young transgender children. With the help of a coalition of state lawmakers and civil rights activists, these families embarked on an uncharted journey of fighting to protect and preserve their children’s human rights and freedoms in this present-day civil rights movement. As one of these parents, Knowlton presents an intimate portrait of her own struggle to protect her 5-year-old transgender daughter from laws inspired by hate and fear.

From tension-filled Senate hearings in Olympia to intimate household settings of the families involved; from thought provoking conversations with key lawmakers to elucidating facts explained by leading scientists, The Most Dangerous Year explores the transgender civil rights battle in all its richness and complexity. While the film follows the story and outcome of anti-transgender legislation in Washington, the heart of the film lies in the stories of the families who made the decision to accept and support their kids for exactly who they are.

The Most Dangerous Year is directed by Seattle based award-winning filmmaker, Vlada Knowlton. Knowlton’s first documentary feature, Having It All, was selected by Washington’s PBS station, KCTS9, as the anchor program for its “Women Who Inspire” series in August, 2015, and went on to also be broadcast by Oregon Public Broadcasting. The Most Dangerous Year premiered at the Seattle International Film Festival, receiving a runner-up award for Best Documentary, and went on to win a Best Social Issue Documentary award at the Atlanta International Documentary Film Festival. The film is produced by Knowlton, along with Chadd Knowlton and Lulu Gargiulo.


About Vlada Knowlton - Director, Writer, Producer, Editor

Vlada is an award-winning filmmaker based in Seattle. Her debut documentary feature, Having It All, was selected by Washington's PBS station, KCTS9, as the anchor program for its “Women Who Inspire” series in August, 2015, and went on to also be broadcast by Oregon Public Broadcasting. Its online premiere, presented by the organizations Flexjobs and 1 Million For Work Flexibility, was a press-covered event that included a panel discussion with Kelly Wallace of CNN. Her current documentary, The Most Dangerous Year, was awarded the Professional Grant from Women in Film Seattle and an Open 4Culture Grant. Vlada holds a doctorate in Cognitive Science from Brown University and worked at Microsoft prior to her filmmaking career.For more information about the film, visit: www.TheMostDangerousYear.com

Connect with us here:

#TheMostDangerousYear

Facebook: @TheMostDangerousYear

Instagram: @VladaKnowlton



In early 2016, when a dark wave of anti-transgender “bathroom bills” began sweeping across the nation, The Human Rights Campaign published a report identifying 2016 as the most dangerous year for transgender Americans. In Washington State six such “bathroom bills” were introduced in the State Legislature. Documentary filmmaker Vlada Knowlton captured the ensuing civil rights battle from the perspective of a small group of embattled parents as they banded together to fight a deluge of proposed laws that would strip away the rights of their young, transgender children. As one of the parents, Knowlton presents an intimate portrait of her own struggle to protect her 5-year-old transgender daughter from laws inspired by ignorance and fear. 


From tension-filled Senate hearings in Olympia to intimate household settings of the families involved; from thought provoking conversations with key lawmakers to elucidating facts explained by leading scientists - The Most Dangerous Year explores the transgender civil rights battle in all its richness and complexity. While the film follows the story and outcome of anti-transgender legislation in Washington, the heart of the film lies in the stories of the families who made the decision to accept and support their kids for exactly who they are.

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